EL DEAFO by Cece Bell named a 2015 Newbery Honor Book!

el deafoCongratulations to Cece Bell, whose graphic novel memoir of growing up deaf, El Deafo (Amulet Books, 2014) has been chosen as a 2015 Honor Book by the John Newbery Medal Committee of the Association of Library Service to Children!

To find out more about this charming book for middle-graders, click here to read my earlier review of El Deafo.

 

Review: EL DEAFO by Cece Bell

el deafoEl Deafo by Cece Bell.  New York: Amulet Books, 2014.

Cece Bell uses the graphic novel format for her memoir of growing up deaf in a hearing family, with an appealing anthropomorphized rabbits standing in for people .  Born hearing, Cece became deaf after a bout of spinal meningitis at age four.  She traces her various adventures with hearing aids, using clever visual techniques to show the difficulties of speechreading and the many miscommunications that can occur.  In first grade, rabbit-Cece receives a new hearing aid called the Phonic Ear, which both embarrasses her with its size and impresses her with its powerful capabilities – when her teacher wears the microphone that goes with it, she can hear what the teacher is doing all over the school , even in the bathroom!  But she struggles to navigate friendships with hearing children – er, rabbits – when she finds herself bouncing between extremes of bossy best friends who want to run her life and friends who are so afraid that they will hurt her that they drift away.  And gradually, she creates her alter-ego, El Deafo, her internal superhero who fights the demons of growing up using the power of the rosette on her undershirt and a giant dose of creativity and positive thinking.  Though the author came late to American Sign Language, she recognizes that her story of growing up as a successful oral deaf child is not a common one, and she shares important background information about deafness and ASL in her author’s note.  Engaging and visually appealing, this is a great read for middle-graders – or for anyone!

Children’s Novels About ASL and Deafness

Deaf Child Crossing by Marlee Matlin. (Simon and Schuster, 2002)

When Cindy, who is hearing, moves in down the street from Megan, who is deaf, the nine-year-olds quickly become best friends. Megan wears hearing aids and lip-reads, but the girls become even closer as Cindy begins to learn sign language. Problems crop up when her attempts to be helpful offend Megan’s sense of independence, and things get even worse at summer camp, where they meet another deaf girl, Lizzie.

Nobody’s Perfect by Marlee Matlin. (Simon and Schuster, 2002)

Megan can’t wait for her positively purple birthday party, but her perfect plans get derailed when a new girl, Alexis, joins her class and rebuffs Megan’s invitation and brushes off all of Megan’s attempts to be friendly.  When Megan teaches Alexis’s autistic brother some basic sign language, it opens up communication with both him and Alexis.

Leading Ladies by Marlee Matlin. (Simon and Schuster, 2007)

Rivalries abound when Megan’s fourth-grade class puts on a production of “The Wizard of Oz” and she has her heart set on playing Dorothy…but so does her friend Lizzie.

Gaps in Stone Walls by John Neufeld. (Athenuem, 1996)

In the late 19th century, hereditary deafness affected at least 1/5 of the population of Chilmark, a town on Martha’s Vineyard. Among this group is Merry Skiffe, an artistic 12-year-old whose peaceful life unravels when wealthy miser Ned Nickerson is murdered on a dark road one Saturday night and Merry finds herself among the four residents of Chilmark who have no alibi.

Apple is my Sign by Mary Riskind. (Houghton Mifflin, 1981)

A 10-year-old boy returns to his parents’ apple farm for the holidays after his first term at a school for the deaf in Philadelphia.