Read Local and Win!

I’m thrilled to be participating in the 2017/2018 Read Local Challenge, sponsored by the MD/DE/WV Region of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators! The Read Local Challenge features traditionally-published authors and illustrators from Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and Washington D.C.

We invite all schools, libraries, homeschool groups, scout troops … groups of any size to join us! Take the challenge to read as many of these books from local authors/illustrators as you can, for a chance to win fabulous prizes, such as signed books and free Skype visits with one of our Read Local authors or illustrators. Then visit our websites to find our already-scheduled book signings and events, or to schedule a visit to your school or library.

Take the Picture Book Challenge, the Middle Grade Challenge, the Young Adult Challenge, or all three!  Click here to learn more.

 

 

 

 

In the Community: Upcoming ASL Events at the Germantown Library

“Deaf Culture Fairy Tales” — Stories for Everyone, Ages 1 to 101!

Get an eyeful of stories, narrated by Dr. Roz Rosen, author of “Deaf Culture Fairy Tales,” a collection of Deaf-centric twists on classical fairytales and fables. Presented in American Sign Language with voice interpretation

Saturday, October 7, 2017
10:30 a.m.—12:00 noon

Germantown Library
19840 Century Blvd
Germantown, MD 20874

Register here.
Co-sponsored by the Maryland Deaf Culture Digital Library in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Deaf Education and 10th anniversary of the Germantown Library. Book sale and signing by author.


Nature and Other Photographs by Deaf Photographer

Ray Conrad captures nature and other scenes with extraordinary detail. Take a look at his photographs in a glass-enclosed exhibit on the first floor of the library in its beautiful rotunda. Ray will be at the exhibit to share his experiences from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 7, also at the Germantown Library.


American Sign Language for Beginners

(sponsored by MCAHIC) – five-session program will take place on Sundays, beginning October 15, from 2:00-4:00 p.m., also at the Germantown Library.

Registration is now open. Space will fill up very quickly – so let your friends and colleagues know. Registration required.


For more information about any of these programs, contact the Germantown Branch, Montgomery County Public Libraries

In the Community: Upcoming ASL Events from Deaf Camps, Inc.

Deaf Camps, Inc. is a nonprofit organization I have been proud to be a part of for 16 years.  Check out these upcoming fundraiser events that will help you enhance your ASL skills! All proceeds from these events support Deaf Camps, Inc.’s 2018 Scholarship Fund.

Silent Saturday

October 14, 2017 from 10am-3pm

Patapsco Valley State Park, Glen Artney Area, Halethorpe, MD$50, PLUS park entrance fee: $3/MD resident, $5/non-resident

Come practice your ASL skills in a safe and supportive voice-off environment. Vocabulary and skill-building workshops, games, and lunch provided. Picnic and play with us in the park! Signers of all levels welcome. All participants please respect the voice-off policy. Silent Saturday information and registration.

 

Parkville Paint Night

Sunday, October 22, 2017, 5-7 PM at Bowman Restaurant, 9306 Harford Rd, Parkville MD 21234

Enjoy an evening out and paint a fall masterpiece to take home with you, led by Tina Young of Canvas Celebrations. No experience necessary – anyone can do it! All materials will be provided. Food and drink will be available for purchase. This event will be accessible in American Sign Language and spoken English. Registration deadline: October 14, 2017.  Purchase Tickets.

Frederick Paint Night

Sunday, November 12, 2017, 5-7 PM at The Braddock Inn, 4830 Schley Ave, Braddock Heights MD 21714

Enjoy an evening out and paint a fall masterpiece to take home with you, led by Tina Young of Canvas Celebrations. No experience necessary – anyone can do it! All materials will be provided. Food and drink will be available for purchase. This event will be accessible in American Sign Language and spoken English. Registration deadline: November 4, 2017. Purchase Tickets.

Free Webinar this Friday: Accessibility and Libraries

I’m so excited to be participating in this FREE webinar with American Libraries Live!  Hope you can join us!

Free Webinar: Accessibility and Libraries

Friday, September 29, 2017
1 p.m. Eastern | 12 p.m. Central
11 a.m. Mountain | 10 a.m. Pacific

Register now

Technology highly influences accessibility—many patrons use assistive technology, such as screen readers, literacy software, and speech input, to access and use library materials and e-resources. This free episode of AL Live explores the rapid growth and development of assistive technology and will help you stay informed and equipped with the best practices to assist your users and tips to ensure your materials are accessible to everyone.
Because planning considerations range from policies and organizational culture to facilities, technologies, and beyond, librarians need to address these issues in a way that is both stable and flexible.

Join us Friday, September 29 at 1 p.m. Eastern as our expert panel discusses the current state of accessibility, the issues many libraries face today, and what we may see in the near future.

Featured panelists for this webinar are: 

  • Jennifer Moore, associate professor, School of Library and Information Studies, Texas Woman’s University
  • Clayton Copeland, faculty and director, Laboratory for Leadership in Equity & Diversity (LLEAD), School of Library and Information Science, University of South Carolina
  • Kathy MacMillan, writer, American Sign Language interpreter, consultant, librarian, and signing storyteller

Don’t miss out! Register today.

Featured Program for Summer Reading 2018: The SIGN-a-long Sing-a-long

The Collaborative Summer Reading Theme for 2018 is: Libraries Rock!

Stories by Hand has you covered with a hands-on, interactive program for all ages that features signs and songs:

SIGN-a-long Sing-a-longTeach your fingers how to sing as we explore American Sign Language through music and stories! Bring the whole family for the hands-on fun as signing (and singing) storyteller Kathy MacMillan teaches you to sign some of your favorite songs. This program can be presented as an all-ages program, or adapted to a baby, toddler, preschooler, or school-age audience.

$300 per program plus mileage; discounts available for multiple bookings.  Click here for complete rates and booking information.

Book a program for Summer 2018 by December 31, 2017 and receive 15% off the program price!  Ask about a free same-day author program for Kathy’s Young Adult novel, Sword and Verse (HarperTeen, 2016)!

 

 

Register for Basic American Sign Language for Library Staff eCourse!

Basic ASL for Library StaffInstructor: Kathy MacMillan, NIC, M.L.S.

Asynchronous eCourse beginning Monday, November 6,  2017 and continuing for 6 weeks (Participants will have 12 weeks to complete course materials)

$195.00

Click here to register.

Estimated Hours of Learning: 30 (Certificate of Completion available upon request)

American Sign Language (ASL) is an invaluable skill for library professionals. A basic grasp of ASL enhances your ability to serve deaf library users and opens up a new world of possibilities for storytime programs. It’s also a marketable professional skill that can translate to public service jobs beyond the library world.

Ideal for those without previous experience, this eCourse taught by librarian and ASL interpreter Kathy MacMillan will use readings, multimedia resources, and online discussion boards to introduce basic ASL vocabulary and grammar appropriate for use in a library setting. MacMillan will place ASL within a linguistic and cultural context, aiding participants in improving library services.

Comments from previous students of this course:

“Thank you for teaching me much more than I expected. It’s been a wonderful experience that I will certainly share with everyone who will listen!”

“This course has been invaluable to me…I am so grateful for the opportunity to participate in the course and truly appreciate someone’s genius in offering it.  The instructor was a gem in the way that she provided comprehensive answers to questions, feedback, tips and resources.”

“I absolutely loved the class and would HIGHLY recommend it to ANYONE — librarian or not!”

“This class was interesting, informative and entertaining. It opened my eyes to a variety of ideas and concepts that can only make me a better librarian as well as a better person. I thought things were well organized and presented in an ordered and logical fashion, each lesson building on the one before.”

Register now!

In the Community: ASL Classes for Children and Adults at the Hearing and Speech Agency

Learn American Sign Language from a Deaf instructor at the Hearing and Speech Agency, a highly-respected Baltimore non-profit.

CLASSES OFFERED FALL 2017

September 12-November 15

MORNING CLASSES
ASL 1: Tuesdays 10:00 a.m. – Noon
ASL 2: Wednesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon

EVENING CLASSES Tuesdays 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
ASL 1, ASL 2, ASL 3, ASL 4, Children’s ASL

Adult ASL classes (10 weeks) are $150. Course materials (book with DVD) are required for your ASL 1, ASL 2, and ASL 3 and cost $85. Once purchased, course materials are good for levels 1, 2, and 3, so they only need to be purchased once. Course materials required for ASL 4 and  ASL 5, need only be purchased once. Summer Fun Signs Course Fee is $100, with no required materials. Children’s ASL classes are $100, no materials required. Parents may accompany a registered child during class for an additional $50.

For more information and to register, click here.

Save the Date!: “ASL for Library Staff” eCourse to be offered again Fall 2017!

The next session of this popular eCourse, taught by Kathy MacMillan, will begin November 6, 2017. Watch this space or sign up to follow this blog by email to be notified when registration is open.

Description: American Sign Language (ASL) is an invaluable skill for library professionals. A basic grasp of ASL enhances your ability to serve deaf library users and opens up a new world of possibilities for storytime programs. It’s also a marketable professional skill that can translate to public service jobs beyond the library world.

Ideal for those without previous experience, this eCourse taught by librarian and ASL interpreter Kathy MacMillan will use readings, multimedia resources, and online discussion boards to introduce basic ASL vocabulary and grammar appropriate for use in a library setting. MacMillan will place ASL within a linguistic and cultural context, aiding participants in improving library services.

Estimated Hours of Learning: 30 (Certificate of Completion available upon request)

Length of Course: 6 weeks (participants will have a total of 12 weeks to complete all assignments)

An Interview with Nancy Churnin, author of THE WILLIAM HOY STORY

A few days ago, I posted my review of Nancy Churnin’s terrific new picture book, The William Hoy Story.  Today, I am excited to share an interview with the author herself!
 .
.

.About the Book:

The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game
By Nancy Churnin
Illustrated by Jez Tuya
All William Ellsworth Hoy wanted to do was play baseball. After losing out on a spot on the local deaf team, William practiced even harder—eventually earning a position on a professional team. But his struggle was far from over. In addition to the prejudice Hoy faced, he could not hear the umpires’ calls. One day he asked the umpire to use hand signals: strike, ball, out. That day he not only got on base but also changed the way the game was played forever. William “Dummy” Hoy became one of the greatest and most beloved players of his time! 

 .
.
.

About the Author

Nancy Churnin is the author of five non-fiction picture book biographies. Her debut, The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game, published by Albert Whitman & Company in March 2016, received a glowing review in The New York Times and was featured in People magazine and USA Today Sports Weekly. William Hoy is a 2017 Storytelling World Resource Award Honor Book and a 2017 North Texas Book Festival Best Children’s Books finalist and is on several book lists: the 2016 New York Public Library Best Books for Kids; the 2017 Texas Library Association 2×2 Reading List and Topaz Nonfiction Reading List; the 2017 Best Children’s Books of the Year, Bank Street College and the 2018 Illinois Monarch Award Master List. Her second book, Manjhi Moves a Mountain (Creston Books), will be published Sept. 1, 2017 and is a fall 2017 Junior Library Guild selection. Coming up in 2018: Charlie Takes His Shot, How Charlie Sifford Broke the Color Barrier in Golf (Albert Whitman); Irving Berlin, the Immigrant Boy Who Made America Sing (Creston Books); The Princess and the First Christmas Tree (Albert Whitman). When she’s not writing children’s books, Nancy keeps busy as the theater critic for The Dallas Morning News. She lives in Texas with her husband, Michael Granberry, their four sons and two cats.
 .
.
.

The Interview

How did you first become interested in the story of William Hoy?
I am the theater critic for The Dallas Morning News. After I wrote a story about a fascinating play being staged at a local high school in Garland, Texas called The Signal Season of Dummy Hoy by Allen Meyer and Michael Nowak, I received a thank you e-mail from Steve Sandy of Ohio. I thanked him for his email and asked why someone from Ohio would be interested in a story about a play in a high school in Garland, Texas. Steve wrote me that he is deaf and shared his dream that more people, hearing and deaf, would know the story about this great deaf hero. Steve told me of his dream that William Hoy would be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, where he would be the first deaf player honored there. The more we discussed this, the more I knew Steve was right. I tried to figure out what I could do to help. That’s when I got the idea that if I wrote a children’s book about William Hoy, the children would help us. And so far, they have. I have personally delivered more than 800 letters from kids to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, which have been entered into his official file in the Hall of Fame library.
 .
.
What kind of research did you do while writing the story?
Steve Sandy is a friend of the Hoy family and he shared all the precious things they had entrusted with him: copies of original letters, newspaper articles, photos. Also very important: Steve gave me an education on what it was like to grow up deaf in the 19th century as William Hoy had. He sent me papers about the international conference of deaf educators in Milan in 1880, when a declaration was made that oral education was better than signing. William Hoy never spoke. He always signed. This helped me understand and be even more in awe of the enormity of what he accomplished — bringing sign language to baseball and succeeding with pride and even a sense of humor on his own terms. In addition to Steve’s help, I am very indebted to Eric Nadel, the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame announcer, who is incredibly knowledgeable about baseball history. He double-checked my baseball references and was kind enough to write a blurb for the back of the book and to read it to kids at Texas Ranger story time sessions.
 .
.

Were there any interesting tidbits about Hoy that didn’t make it into the story?

So many! One of the reasons it took me as long as it did to get to the final draft of this story (13 years, but who’s counting), was to figure out how to focus the story. I was able to add some anecdotes to the back matter, but I find kids enjoy hearing stories that didn’t make it into the book. I’ve got lots of stories, but my favorite one that didn’t make it is about his honesty. William was an amazing outfielder who made incredible catches. One day he was out in centerfield and the ball comes in very low. He catches it. The umpire calls the runner out. William shakes his head. No. The ball hit the ground. The runner was safe. One of the players on his team threw his cap on the ground because he was so mad! Years later, at the end of William’s life, a reporter asked him what his proudest moment in baseball was. William Hoy set a lot of records over the years. He even hit a grand slam to help the Chicago White Sox win the American pennant in 1901. But his proudest moment? The one where he let the umpire know the runner was safe.
 .

.
Your book presents a very human, relatable portrait of Hoy. How did you navigate the challenges of creating a story full of moving details while keeping it historically accurate?
I realized I needed to figure out what William’s dream was, how he had achieved that dream and what he and we could learn from his journey. His dream was to play baseball. He achieved his dream through persistence, hard work and realizing that the very thing that made him different from his teammates — his deafness — was his gift. His mother applauding him in sign language in the beginning of the book returns as a memory to help him in the middle of the book when he can’t seem to connect with his teammates, the opposing team or the fans. The signs not only help him succeed in making those connections and being a successful baseball player, they make baseball a better game. Finally, the sign for applause becomes a way for the fans to show their love for him. I followed my instincts in writing the story. I went back and checked with Steve Sandy and Eric Nadel to make sure I hadn’t written anything that wasn’t historically accurate. I am so happy that the book has their blessing and the blessing of the Hoy family.
 .
. 
In the book’s acknowledgements, you mention that you are on the “Hoy for the Hall” Committee, campaigning to get William Hoy inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  Please tell us more about the campaign and how readers can support it!
This book got its start with my determination to help Steve achieve his dream of getting William Hoy in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Everywhere I present the book I ask kids if they think he should be in the Hall of Fame. They do! Then I ask them if they will draw pictures or write letters to the Hall of Fame. Some send me copies so I can post on my Facebook pages at Nancy Churnin Children’s Books and Nancy Churnin and on Twitter @nchurnin.  You can find the address for the National Baseball Hall of Fame in the free downloadable teachers guide on the Albert Whitman website.
 .
.
Anything else you want readers to know about the book?
This was a labor of love, which kicked off a passion to tell more true stories of people who are not well known, but should be. I have four more children’s books coming out and none of this would have been possible if I had not gotten the opportunity to tell William’s inspiring story. I am so appreciative of Steve and his wife, Bonnie, who have become such good friends to me. I am thankful for the opportunity to get to know wonderful people in the deaf community. It has been my honor and privilege to be interviewed by DPanTV alongside Steve Sandy about William Hoy, which you can see here. I am thrilled about all the people who have taken William Hoy’s story to their hearts and spread the word, through blog posts, reviews, interviews and putting the book on state reading lists because that helps get William’s story in the hands and hearts of more children.
  .

I recently heard from an 11-year-old boy I met at an airport last summer, waiting to get on a plane. I gave this little boy and his sister a copy of the book, which I autographed. Now, a year later, I received an email from the boy, saying he had been to his native Japan and saw The William Hoy Story in Japanese. He wrote that he found the books “piled up in front of the cashier as selected one of must-read books for 3rd and 4th graders during summer vacation. I was so excited and got one. I love this story!! I just wanted to let you know this great news.Thank you.” A letter like that is everything to me.
 

 .
.

Review: The William Hoy Story by Nancy Churnin

 

The William Hoy Story by Nancy Churnin.  Illustrated by Jez Tuya.  (Albert Whitman and Company, 2017)

William Ellsworth Hoy has long been a hero of the Deaf community – a record-setting baseball player who played for multiple National League teams and changed the way that baseball was played. Churnin’s approachable text and Tuya’s expressive illustrations take readers along with William’s struggles to be taken seriously by the hearing world – which, in the 1880s, didn’t believe a deaf player could amount to much. William proves the critics wrong through determination, grit, and talent, and soon teams and fans are clamoring for him. Many biographies of Hoy get hung up on his nickname, “Dummy”, which was a common term applied to deaf people at the time, but Churnin wisely keeps the focus on Hoy’s accomplishments throughout the story, saving such details, with contextualizing comments, for an informative afterward. A timeline of Hoy’s life offers more details for baseball lovers.

Coming soon: an interview with the author!